Backup Appliances - The Answer to All-in-One Data Protection? Page 2 - EnterpriseStorageForum.com

Backup Appliances - The Answer to All-in-One Data Protection? Page 2

Plug & Play
By definition, a backup appliance must plug into a data environment through whatever network path is most logical for data movement, and provide a true "enterprise" capability. Users should be backed up, whether they are on a LAN, WAN or whether their data is located locally or in some virtual NAS or SAN location:

  • LAN Friendly: in circumstances where data must be copied off a LAN location over a fiber or other backbone, the backup appliance must operate without problem, but most data should be handled over the common traffic area used by the bulk of users, without additional burden to the network. As networks increase in speed, the backup appliance must operate without burdening the normal traffic patterns on the LAN. In the case of WAN users, options for byte-level change backups must be provided.

  • Data Agnostic: data can be located by the backup appliance on any of the many locations where users access files, including locally attached, mapped drives, NAS locations, SAN locations, and remotely managed data over intra or internets.

Ease of Use
Backup, archive and disaster recovery begin with ease of use from the customer, which will include any person who manages data. This includes individual users, system managers, database administrators, etc. Also, a backup appliance must apply services to all systems, including laptops, workstations, servers, clusters, etc.

  • Easy to use: minutes a day to manage and administrate - simple to navigate.

  • Plug and Play: installs in minutes - network connectivity, component connectivity, and client connectivity.

  • Heterogeneous: backs up and restores all popular platforms. Clients can be added to the system easily and remotely.

Functionality
Backup will move data to an on-line location where all files can be restored that a customer identifies as meeting a restore requirement. This on-line location backup should be managed by policies based upon a data retention set by a customer, not by limitations of hardware. If customer wants expired or deleted files available for up to one year, they can have that on-line.

Restore functions allow users at any level (from laptop to large RISC systems) to bring back files by communicating directly with the backup service or server, if that requirement is called for. Restores should be available at the file level or some backup set level, both identified by a user.

Archive is a point-in-time capture of any set of active data a customer requires to save for any period of time, which can be kept on-site. Retrieve is the ability to bring back any set of data described as an archive.

Users should have access to their restores and retrieves, if allowed, without the requirement to contact a system manager. This should be an easy-to-use function of their workstation utilities and tools.

Technology
Backup should be quick enough to fit any window requirement that can be met by hardware specs. Features and capabilities that should be included are as follows:

  • Scheduled or journal or polling capabilities
  • Backup media is virtual or "pools" allowing disk, tape, or optical
  • LAN, WAN support
  • SAN, NAS support
  • Backup over any IP pipe

Restore should be quick enough to fit any window requirement that can be met by hardware specs. The following features should also be provided:

  • File, directory, wild card, disk, or system restores available
  • Restore to original location, or another location specified
  • Restore by file, wild card, etc.
  • Restore by user, manager, system manager, or various password options
  • Restore over any IP pipe

Archive should allow data to be kept over any length of time. Also, the archive capability should also provide for the following features:

  • Schedule capabilities
  • Archive media is virtual or kept in "pools" allowing for disk, tape, or optical storage
  • LAN, WAN support
  • SAN, NAS support
  • Archive over any IP pipe

Retrieve (restoring an archive) should be quick enough to fit any window requirement that can be met by hardware specs and should include features such as:

  • File, directory, wild card, disk, or packet of files retrieve available
  • Restore to original location, or another location as specified
  • Restore by file, wild card, etc.
  • Restore by user, manager, system manager, or various password options
  • Restore over any IP pipe

Summary
Backup Appliances are the next logical step for an organization that wishes to streamline it's backup, archive and disaster recovery functions. By combining all of these functions into a single appliance, they are able to do this while not sacrificing anything in terms of data protection or recovery capability.


John Pearring is president of STORServer., Inc. For more information on STORServer products, including the STORServer Backup Appliance, visit www.storserver.com



Page 2 of 2

Previous Page
1 2
 

Comment and Contribute

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have characters left.

 

 

Storage Daily
Don't miss an article. Subscribe to our newsletter below.

Thanks for your registration, follow us on our social networks to keep up-to-date