E-Mail Archiving Gets a New Player

PivotStor hopes to stand out in the crowded e-mail archiving market by packing its appliances with features and offering them at a low starting price.

The startup’s EP Series e-mail management appliances offer archiving, indexing, classification, encryption, antivirus protection and spam filtering starting as low $1,250 for a desktop unit that scales to 50 e-mail accounts and $5,995 for a small business model that can handle up to 1,000 users. Enterprise-class appliances can handle more than 2,500 users and 800,000 e-mails a day.

The appliances are meant to ensure compliance with regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley, Basel II, the UK Data Protection Act and more.

Users can decide how much unwanted e-mail they filter out and where they filter it, such as at the gateway or e-mail server, depending on which regulatory requirements they face, said product manager Ian Stretton.

“We make sure that everything that enters the system is clean and wanted,” said Stretton.

The appliances monitor outbound e-mail too.

PivotStor claims the products, which are based on Intel hardware, are easy to use and can be up and running in less than an hour, with a management interface that allows for easy recovery. The appliances support Exchange, Lotus Notes, LDAP, SMTP and POP3 servers.

The appliances will be sold through channel partners only. “We will never take accounts away from our partners and sell direct,” said PivotStor president Jack Corrao, a BakBone and Certance veteran. “Every product we sell, every sale we make will be handled by a channel partner.”

Corrao and Stretton said the products were architected as a complete appliance for channel partners who wanted to offer customers one-stop shopping.

The year-old company is also taking its channel-only approach to the tape market, where it has been shipping libraries for two quarters, and plans to develop other integrated products in the future.

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Paul Shread
eSecurity Editor Paul Shread has covered nearly every aspect of enterprise technology in his 20+ years in IT journalism, including an award-winning series on software-defined data centers. He wrote a column on small business technology for Time.com, and covered financial markets for 10 years, from the dot-com boom and bust to the 2007-2009 financial crisis. He holds a market analyst certification.

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